The Jonah Mowry Story: Fake tears lead to YouTube fame?

 

It took only a few months before Jonah Mowry a victim of bullying to be heard around the world. And you too probably have seen this 4 minute video of him presenting his story on index cards. The story reaches a point in most people of whether or not he is telling the truth or if he is faking the entire situation. You are simply left to decide by yourself, but Mowry has released a statement on his video in the description box. He says

 I didn’t know how to say what I needed to say. All I could think about were all the bad things that had been happening at school last year, every year for that matter. I just couldn’t bare to go through that anymore. I was done being fake happy, pretending hateful words didn’t hurt, done hiding it from my family.

Like Jonah Mowry, I too know what it is like to be playing it fake and struggling with bullying. I talk about this same thing in my video, The Story of America’s Future Talk Show Host, I describe the same scenarios where I am called names and was struggling with my identity. It is quite compelling to have released my video and shortly after Jonah’s story appears. When I was 14-years-old, I did not have a video camera or the advantages of getting out what I was going through like Jonah. I was stuck in a time when all I could do was go to the guidance counselor and just go home and get bullied there too. That was six years ago. 

Today I look back on my dark times and I still feel a part of me not fitting in, especially with my image. I am tall and skinny. Not muscular like the other gay boys. I have people constantly telling me to eat, like that Point Park security guard. He tells me every time I see him that “You need to eat something kid.” But he is not alone, many people do it and it makes me feel inferior to be the way I am. So, I’m left with a constant battle with my self-esteem and how a gay person is suppose to be and act. I do want to let you know that struggles with people, image, and perception are indeed a lot of baggage to carry for one person. I just wrote an article about Rosie O’Donnell and how her engagement news isn’t buzzing through the social media grapevine like other celebrity engagements.

So what makes the Jonah Mowry story so inspiring? Is it the tears? The music (which I don’t know if his family can be sued for using that song)? Or could it be his age and how frail we look at youth today? We are left to make up our own interpretation. 

Mowry does confirm online that his video is real and he is much more sociable today. 

…yes I do have friends, my High School friends, and I have made friends because when I came out they realized that they had hurt me and that they [felt] sorry. The video is real, and true.

So are friendships based on pity and not genuine pleasure of being someone’s friend?  I do think it can be a case if he made friends after this video went viral. I am not sure though, but for the coming out age; you begin aligning yourself with people that are like you. I remember coming out to people at Milton Hershey and people really came up to me and asked if I was gay. The attention was enthralling. I felt wanted and not so much hurt, because I understood having an identity was something every other kid only yearned for. With this, I can vouche to say that Jonah’s social life most likely has both a mixture of pity and true friendships, like I had and currently still have. 

I know there are people who only talk to me because I am very close to becoming a national television talk show host and have contacts to help further their own careers. However, I also know there are people who genuinely care about me and could careless if I am famous or not. 

The fact of the video is that personal transformation has happened. We can nit pick over the minor details like we can’t see his scars or that he misspells words, but the truth lies within the story. The story is inspiring because it expresses change and it is symbolic for today’s culture. And that is a goal in my life to help inspire people with my story just like Jonah has with his. 

I’d like to think that the greatest weapon we have against bullies, violence, and negativity is our ability to be our truest selves and let our soul permeate the world with genuine and honest energies. Anyone can transform  and you should witness and use the ability to inspire, dream, and  create everyday. Even if it means making a sad or potentially copyright infringing video.

 

2 Comments

  1. I had not watched this video prior to seeing it on your blog. And it breaks my heart. My oldest son, 9 years old, is bullied quite a bit. I help him as much as I can by talking to other parents, talking to the other kids, etc. I don’t allow it… but there is only so much I can do. He cries sometimes because he has no friends. He is an intelligent, kind-hearted and amazing child, but apparently his peers don’t see that. We are a poor family, and he doesn’t have all the newest, fashionable clothes. He’s not athletic and coordinated. He is a “nerd” by their standards, and so he gets picked on. Its so frustrating as a parent who CARES (because so many don’t nowadays) to try and do the right thing, and try to get the bullying to stop. But kids are being raised more and more without their parents, and they are becoming more and more heartless. Its sad…. and just imagine these kids that are such awful bullies will be our next generation of politicians, doctors, lawyers, etc. What will become of us?

    1. Unfair is what I believe it comes too. It is quite interesting to think that kids today are getting what the want more easily. So the kids who don’t get everything their little heart desires will sense out of place. But of the parents just told them the truth about money troubles then maturity will arise. Parents should be real with their kids. Your story is probably not the only one out there–we shall rise together once people understand great change is coming and it doesn’t include name calling.

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